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Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Simulation with the SPH Method

dc.contributor.authorHušek, Martincs
dc.contributor.authorKala, Jiřícs
dc.contributor.authorKrál, Petrcs
dc.contributor.authorHokeš, Filipcs
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T11:55:30Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T11:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-12cs
dc.identifier.citationIOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. 2017, vol. 245, issue 1, p. 1-10.en
dc.identifier.issn1757-899Xcs
dc.identifier.other146046cs
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11012/137176
dc.description.abstractSteel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is very popular in many branches of civil engineering. Thanks to its increased ductility, it is able to resist various types of loading. When designing a structure, the mechanical behaviour of SFRC can be described by currently available material models (with equivalent material for example) and therefore no problems arise with numerical simulations. But in many scenarios, e.g. high speed loading, it would be a mistake to use such an equivalent material. Physical modelling of the steel fibres used in concrete is usually problematic, though. It is necessary to consider the fact that mesh-based methods are very unsuitable for high-speed simulations with regard to the issues that occur due to the effect of excessive mesh deformation. So-called meshfree methods are much more suitable for this purpose. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is currently the best choice, thanks to its advantages. However, a numerical defect known as tensile instability may appear when the SPH method is used. It causes the development of numerical (false) cracks, making simulations of ductile types of failure significantly more difficult to perform. The contribution therefore deals with the description of a procedure for avoiding this defect and successfully simulating the behaviour of SFRC with the SPH method. The essence of the problem lies in the choice of coordinates and the description of the integration domain derived from them – spatial (Eulerian kernel) or material coordinates (Lagrangian kernel). The contribution describes the behaviour of both formulations. Conclusions are drawn from the fundamental tasks, and the contribution additionally demonstrates the functionality of SFRC simulations. The random generation of steel fibres and their inclusion in simulations are also discussed. The functionality of the method is supported by the results of pressure test simulations which compare various levels of fibre reinforcement of SFRC specimens.en
dc.description.abstractSteel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is very popular in many branches of civil engineering. Thanks to its increased ductility, it is able to resist various types of loading. When designing a structure, the mechanical behaviour of SFRC can be described by currently available material models (with equivalent material for example) and therefore no problems arise with numerical simulations. But in many scenarios, e.g. high speed loading, it would be a mistake to use such an equivalent material. Physical modelling of the steel fibres used in concrete is usually problematic, though. It is necessary to consider the fact that mesh-based methods are very unsuitable for high-speed simulations with regard to the issues that occur due to the effect of excessive mesh deformation. So-called meshfree methods are much more suitable for this purpose. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is currently the best choice, thanks to its advantages. However, a numerical defect known as tensile instability may appear when the SPH method is used. It causes the development of numerical (false) cracks, making simulations of ductile types of failure significantly more difficult to perform. The contribution therefore deals with the description of a procedure for avoiding this defect and successfully simulating the behaviour of SFRC with the SPH method. The essence of the problem lies in the choice of coordinates and the description of the integration domain derived from them – spatial (Eulerian kernel) or material coordinates (Lagrangian kernel). The contribution describes the behaviour of both formulations. Conclusions are drawn from the fundamental tasks, and the contribution additionally demonstrates the functionality of SFRC simulations. The random generation of steel fibres and their inclusion in simulations are also discussed. The functionality of the method is supported by the results of pressure test simulations which compare various levels of fibre reinforcement of SFRC specimens.cs
dc.formattextcs
dc.format.extent1-10cs
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfcs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherIOP Publishingcs
dc.relation.ispartofIOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineeringcs
dc.relation.urihttp://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1757-899X/245/3/032070cs
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unportedcs
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/cs
dc.subjectSPH Methoden
dc.subjectstell fibre reinforced concreteen
dc.subjectcivil engineeringen
dc.subjectSPH Method
dc.subjectstell fibre reinforced concrete
dc.subjectcivil engineering
dc.titleSteel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Simulation with the SPH Methoden
dc.title.alternativeSteel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Simulation with the SPH Methodcs
thesis.grantorVysoké učení technické v Brně. Fakulta stavební. Ústav stavební mechanikycs
sync.item.dbidVAV-146046en
sync.item.dbtypeVAVen
sync.item.insts2019.08.08 16:54:54en
sync.item.modts2019.08.08 16:12:35en
dc.coverage.issue1cs
dc.coverage.volume245cs
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1757-899X/245/3/032070cs
dc.rights.accessopenAccesscs
dc.rights.sherpahttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1757-899X/cs
dc.type.driverconferenceObjecten
dc.type.statusPeer-revieweden
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionen


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