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dc.contributor.authorJekl, Vladimírcs
dc.contributor.authorBřínek, Adamcs
dc.contributor.authorZikmund, Tomášcs
dc.contributor.authorJeklová, Editacs
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Jozefcs
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T15:56:28Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T15:56:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-01cs
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Veterinary Science. 2021, vol. 8, issue 1, p. 1-7.en
dc.identifier.issn2297-1769cs
dc.identifier.other173273cs
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11012/203325
dc.description.abstractAdverse effects of high dietary phosphorus on bone health have been observed in both animal and human studies. The aim of the investigation was to examine chronic effects of high phosphorus diet on the apical mandibular cortical thickness and volume in a hystricomorph rodent (Octodon degus) using microcomputed tomography. Male degus were randomly divided into two groups fed by different mineral contents from the age of 12 weeks till the age of 17 months. The micro-CT scanning and wall thickness analysis were applied on the region of the mandible exactly under the apices of the 4th premolar tooth, first molar tooth, and second molar tooth in two animals from each group. General overview and mapping of the ventral mandibular bone thickness revealed pronounced bony mandibular protrusions in all the animals fed a high-phosphorus diet with obvious bone thinning apically to the 4th premolar and first and second molar tooth apices. Mandibular bone volume and thickness located apically to the premolar and molars were statistically significantly smaller/thinner in the group fed by a high phosphorus diet. The thinnest bone measured 0.004 mm, where the mandibular 4th premolar tooth almost perforated the mandibular cortex. Similar studies of metabolic bone disease and its influence on alveolar bone were also published in rats and mice. The influence of different environmental, infectious, or metabolic factors on the growing tooth, alveolar bone formation, and bone pathologies must be done experimentally on growing animals. In contrast, degus have continuously growing dentition, and the effect of any of the above listed factors can be studied in this animal model at any age and for longer time periods.en
dc.formattextcs
dc.format.extent1-7cs
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfcs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherFrontierscs
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Veterinary Sciencecs
dc.relation.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2021.759093/fullcs
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalcs
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/cs
dc.subjectmicro-CTen
dc.subjectrodenten
dc.subjectvolume thicknessen
dc.subjectcortical boneen
dc.subjectdegu (Octodon degus)en
dc.subjectdentistryen
dc.subjectdental diseaseen
dc.titleUse of Micro-CT Imaging to Assess Ventral Mandibular Cortical Thickness and Volume in an Experimental Rodent Model With Chronic High-Phosphorus Intakeen
thesis.grantorVysoké učení technické v Brně. Středoevropský technologický institut VUT. Středoevropský technologický institut VUTcs
sync.item.dbidVAV-173273en
sync.item.dbtypeVAVen
sync.item.insts2022.01.24 16:57:23en
sync.item.modts2022.01.24 16:16:43en
dc.coverage.issue1cs
dc.coverage.volume8cs
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fvets.2021.759093cs
dc.rights.accessopenAccesscs
dc.rights.sherpahttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/2297-1769/cs
dc.type.driverarticleen
dc.type.statusPeer-revieweden
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionen


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International